Update on Crash

Update on Crash

Adopted January 2, 2017

Dog’s former name Crash: it fits him so well

What are the best things about your dog?
His quirks, affection and playfulness.

Tells us about your dogs favorite activities, sports or training:
He loves to run, “crash” into things and play “zoomies”. He loves other dogs, toys and treats.

Do you have any extraordinary adventures or accomplishments?
Crash was very nervous at his first puppy training class. The teacher had to put him and me behind a covered barrier in the corner to help him calm down. Crash worked hard with me every morning to train. At the end of the class, the teacher could not believe Crash’s improvement. She said he was a different dog. I believe he was the same special dog, but with more confidence :).

How do people react to your “pit bull?”
Crash may not be a pit bull after all. He is pretty tiny. Crash plays well with other pits and we make sure to spend time with them.

Does your dog have any nicknames?
Crashy, Kermit, Pupsie, Grandpa. These are all names my 13-year-old son has given him. My son is smitten with Crash.

FAST FIVE with Crash

1. Food: Piggy or picky? Piggy

2. Dog beds: Sleep on or unstuff? Unstuff after he was no longer a pup

3. Travel: Car rides or car sick? Rides

4. Water: No way or splash all day? No way

5. Seasons: A day in the sun or a day in the snow? A day in the sun; sun bather

Submitted by Amanda

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Update on Layla

Update on Layla

Adopted January 2017

Dog’s former name Leila

What are the best things about your dog?
She is loving, energetic, smart and so sweet.

Tells us about your dogs favorite activities, sports or training:
Layla loves to play tug and will catch anything way up in the air. It’s amazing how high she can jump. She’s in her third training, it’s the advanced class since she’s already passed the beginner and intermediate classes.

Do you have any extraordinary adventures or accomplishments?
She, unfortnately, had a sock in her intestines when we adopted her. She didn’t show any signs of issues at her foster home so they had no idea. Thankfully she recovered fully and is doing wonderful.

How do people react to your “pit bull?”
Most are a little hesitant at first but her wagging tail wins them over.

FAST FIVE with Layla

1. Food: Piggy or picky? Piggy, big time!

2. Dog beds: Sleep on or unstuff? Sleep on our bed

3. Travel: Car rides or car sick? Car rides

4. Water: No way or splash all day? Splash all day

5. Seasons: A day in the sun or a day in the snow? Sun

Submitted by Linda F.

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Female/Female Dog Households

Female/Female Dog Households

The conversation comes up all the time, and it’s been a topic of discussion again recently: “Should you, or should you not, have two female dogs in the same household?” We hear plenty of stories about two females that get along great together – and that’s amazing, but it’s not typical. There are countless research studies that show females have a higher rate of aggression toward other females than they do toward males, or than males have toward other males. And we have to give creed to all this information. Here are just a few snipits of this type of research:

“There is a higher incidence of aggressive behavior between dogs of the same sex. Two males or two females will often view each other as rivals, even if they appear to get along most of the time. This is a fact for every breed.”
Source: http://www.pbrc.net/

“When two dogs of the same sex live in a household together, they are required to decide which one will be the top dog and which one will be the bottom dog. The ‘decision making’ can become nasty and even violent. The ultimate pecking order can have an undesirable effect on both of the dog’s personalities—one of the dogs can become dominant to an unhealthy degree and the other can be pushed so far into submission that it’s not good for him. In this common scenario, the top dog becomes tyrannical and the bottom dog lives a nerve-wracking life of perpetual submission. This is an unyieldingly stressful set of circumstances for the entire household.”
Source: https://www.canidae.com/blog/2012/02/does-gender-matter-when-adopting-second/

“Generally, I like male/female pairings in a two-dog household, then male/male pairings, with female/female pairings at the bottom of the list. That is not to say you can’t see successful duos with all of these combos, but I think most behavior consultants would agree that the worst cases of interdog aggression are usually between females, and when these dogs live in the same home, managing the situation can be a nightmare for the owners — and is tough on the dogs, too. Generally, a second dog of the opposite sex is a good idea for most families.”
Source: http://www.dogster.com/lifestyle/5-things-to-consider-second-dog

“Same-sex dogs are more likely to fight. Two males (or two females) are much more likely to fight than a male and a female. This is true of every breed, not just pit bulls, because two dogs of the same sex are likely to see each other as rivals.”
Source: http://www.bullymax.com

“The first thing that might be surprising to most people is that female dogs are more often involved in fights than are males. [In a recent study] only 32 percent of aggressive incidents involved conflict between two males, while in the remaining 68 percent, females were active participants. This is consistent with previous research which showed that when females get into an aggressive situation, injuries are apt to be more severe and the fights tend to be longer and more furious.”
Source: https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/canine-corner/201404/aggression-between-dogs-in-the-same-household

To sum up, Save-a-Bull’s position is this: dog aggression is a behavior found in every breed, but because of their breed history, pit bulls might be less tolerant of other dogs. Add to this the research showing female dogs are less tolerant of other females and it can create a recipe for disaster. As pit bull advocates and owners, it is our responsibility to understand our dogs and to put them in a position to succeed. It is because of this that we will not place a female dog into a home with another female dog.

“Let’s not blame the dogs for a trait bred into them by the evilness of man. Let’s understand them instead, so we can provide responsible ownership and give them a chance to show the world why they are so deserving of our love.
~ Unknown

Update on Madeline

Update on Madeline

Adopted December 2016

Dog’s former name Madeline

What are the best things about your dog?
Since day one, we have thought that she acts like such a cat in every way possible. We believe that she was once a cat in a former life and reincarnated into the best kitty/doggy combo. She is sweet, kind, sassy, hilarious, self-entertaining, carefree, incredibly patient and laser focused when she wants something (specifically a toy that her brother, Jefferson has). She has golden eye that will make your heart burst with love.

Tells us about your dogs favorite activities, sports or training:
She loves to go on walks, hikes and runs. She loves to go camping and on car rides. She loves to learn new tricks and to see how quickly she can power through a Nylabone.

Do you have any extraordinary adventures or accomplishments?
She has caught two squirrels and a few birds with the help of Jefferson. He runs them down and she runs off with them as if she did all of the hard work herself.

How do people react to your “pit bull?”
She is just an itty bitty kitty so not too many people assume that she is.

Does your dog have any nicknames? 
Maddy, Girlie, kitty cat, Mad-Kitty, Squirt, Short-stack.

FAST FIVE with Madeline

1. Food: Piggy or picky? Both

2. Dog beds: Sleep on or unstuff? Both

3. Travel: Car rides or car sick? Rides!

4. Water: No way or splash all day? Shes starting to being a splash all day kinda gal

5. Seasons: A day in the sun or a day in the snow? Sunshine!

Submitted by Cassie and Brent N.

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Update on Oliver

Update on Oliver

Adopted January 2017

Dog’s former name Cesar

What are the best things about your dog?
Oliver is a big lazy cuddle monster, but he can also be super playful with his favorite toys. He makes the cutest grunting noises when he is hugged. He also will nibble my fingers when he wants to be pet.

Tells us about your dogs favorite activities, sports or training:
He loves going for walks by the river and he thinks car rides are the bomb. As for training, he doesn’t mind it, but it can be a lot of work sometimes. During Obedience 1, he would last about 30 minutes, then it was hard to get him to do much.

Do you have any extraordinary adventures or accomplishments?
Oliver has completed Obedience 1. He also has been on a couple of camping adventures, and he loves to visit his doggy friends.

How do people react to your “pit bull?”
Their initial reaction is a bit apprehensive because he is big, black, and bulky. Some people have made a point of walking around him when we are in public. However, once people give him a chance, they find out that he is the biggest love bug.

Does your dog have any nicknames?
Bubba, Baby Bear, Olly and Olly Bear.

FAST FIVE with Oliver

1. Food: Piggy or picky? Piggy

2. Dog beds: Sleep on or unstuff? Sleep on

3. Travel: Car rides or car sick? Car rides

4. Water: No way or splash all day? No way

5. Seasons: A day in the sun or a day in the snow? A day in the sun

Submitted by Tracie Y

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